<h2>Remco Torenbosch</h2>
Now available:

European contextualising (...)
With contributions by Charles Esche,
Mihnea Mircan, Council of Europe

Black Dog Publishing, London

ISBN-10: 1908966696
Hardback: 244 pages



Black Dog Publishing London, 2014

This publication is the result of an extensive period of research into the history of the European Flag, opening up intriguing discussion on the changing socio-economics of EU nations, the disappearance of once booming textile industries and the strong individual identities of a union in flux.



This publication profiles the documents, design proposals and written correspondence between Heitz, Lévy, and further collaborators they would form the painstakingly diplomatic development of an iconic vexillological moment.

As part of the book's research, a collection of fabric monochromes woven by weavers from all 28 member states of the EU in th base colour of the flag was compiled. These collated monochromes as such become a map themselves of the socio-economic shift within EU member communities, an embodiment of the disappearing textile industries of Europe.


Contributors: Charles Esche, Mihnea Mircan, Council of Europe Archive

European contextualising (...)
Hardback: 244 pages
Publisher: Black Dog Publishing London
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1908966696
ISBN-13: 978-1908966698
€ 20,00

Images
Order here


Upcoming:

Blue Times



Kunsthalle Wien, Vienna

October 3, 2014 — January 11, 2015
Curators: Amira Gad, Nicolaus Schafhausen



Kunsthalle Wien
, Vienna, Austria

Any history of color is, above all, a social history. Blue has a long and topsy-­‐turvy history in the Western world. Once considered a hot color, it is now icy cool. This group exhibition delineates the historical narrative of a color: blue. It traces and narrates the historical and social trajectory of a color, looking at the role or significance that a color can play within a society and how this has been reflected in visual culture, pop culture, art, and more. The show re-­‐stages or reflects, in a way, this social historical narrative via one color.

Participants: coming soon



This exhibition is inter-­‐disciplinary and historical by design and tells our story through the filter of the color blue. It makes reference to key moments that marked our social history as well as it refers to an underlying story of our evolution, it highlights how the color blue went from being a sacred color to becoming a symbol of freedom via the United Nations Blue.




Event about the European Blue(s)
with: Mihnea Mircan, Amira Gad, Nicolaus Schafhausen, Remco Torenbosch

Kunsthalle Wien, Vienna
November 18, 2014
Curators: Amira Gad, Nicolaus Schafhausen



Kunsthalle Wien
, Vienna, Austria

In the context of the intsive research into the history of the European Flag, opening up intriguing discussion on the changing socio-economics of EU nations, the disappearance of once booming textile industries and the strong individual identities of a union in flux, Kunsthalle Wien organised an event in the context of the European Blue(s).

Speakers: Tom Holert, Mihnea Mircan, Amira Gad, Nicolaus Schafhausen, Remco Torenbosch



This event is part of the Blue Times exhibition curated by Amira Gad and Nicolaus Schafhausen.

Any history of color is, above all, a social history. Blue has a long and topsy-­‐turvy history in the Western world. Once considered a hot color, it is now icy cool. This group exhibition delineates the historical narrative of a color: blue. It traces and narrates the historical and social trajectory of a color, looking at the role or significance that a color can play within a society and how this has been reflected in visual culture, pop culture, art, and more. The show re-­‐stages or reflects, in a way, this social historical narrative via one color.




The Value of Nothing



TENT, Rotterdam
September 4 — November 11, 2014
Curators: Jesse van Oosten, Michel v. Dartel



TENT, Rotterdam, the Netherlands


How can we rethink the concept of value without departing from common financial and economic standards? What alternatives are there to determining what is valuable? How is the immaterial valued? The Value of Nothing shows artistic practices and projects that arise out of or concentrate on different economies, new value systems, and alternative work strategies.

Participants: Meschac Gaba, Jeanne van Heeswijk, Iratxe Jaio + Klaas van Gorkum, Priscila Fernandes, Helmut Smits, Gil & Moti, Oblique International, Kym Ward, Roel Roscam Abbing, Weronika Zielinska, Antonia Hirsch, Paolo Cirio, Jonas Staal, ZUS, Claire Fontaine, Bill Balaskas, Remco Torenbosch, Jonas Lund




The core of the project comprises five new projects by Jeanne van Heeswijk, Helmut Smits, Meschac Gaba, Remco Torenbosch and Jonas Lund. The projects address the role of the market, alternative forms of valuation or the changing meaning of economic exchange.




Size Matters,
In relation to Minimalism


Fort Vijfhuizen, Vijfhuizen
July 6 — August 31, 2014
Curator: Nathalie Zonnenberg



Fort Vijfhuizen, Vijfhuizen, the Netherlands


Objectivity, seriality, reproducibility and participation of these aspects have been given a new meaning. In the work of the artists in this exhibition In particular, the physical aspect of Minimal Art, the 'Gestalt', plays a crucial role. In various works The scheme of the works in this exhibition compared with the characteristic areas of the Arts Fort. The visitors complete if it were the work, it's their body that determines the size of things.

Participants: Eva Berendes, Lucas Lenglet, Navid Nuur, Esther Stocker, Remco Torenbosch




Fort at Vijfhuizen is part of the sector Locks in the Stelling van Amsterdam. It was the task of this fort to the ring canal and embankment of the Haarlemmermeer polder and the remaining dry strip of land along the western edge of the polder, to defend.

Fort at Vijfhuizen is based on the design model 'A' from 1897, where the retractable turrets had an independent place on the flank angles. Is also a so-called Genius Shed on site. This metal Genie Shed is the only surviving example of this type. In the nearby Geniedijk is a secondary battery.





A talk between Mirjam Westen
and Remco Torenbosch



Museum Arnhem, Arnhem
June 29, 2014
Curator: Mirjam Westen




Museum Arnhem, Arnhem, the Netherlands


In the context of the intensive research into the history of the European Flag, opening up intriguing discussion on the changing socio-economics of EU nations, the disappearance of once booming textile industries and the strong individual identities of a union in flux. Museum Arnhem organised an event in the context of the European Blue(s).

Speakers: Mirjam Westen, Remco Torenbosch




Threads will feature works from more than 20 international artists and designers in which the medium of thread or textiles play a prominent role. Their work can be seen as a metaphor for the ‘interweaving’ of artistry and craft; art and the public; and personal and societal themes.


Now:

Threads




Museum Arnhem, Arnhem

March 15 — Augustus 17, 2014
Curator: Mirjam Westen




Museum Arnhem, Arnhem, the Netherlands


Threads will feature works from more than 20 international artists and designers in which the medium of thread or textiles play a prominent role. Their work can be seen as a metaphor for the ‘interweaving’ of artistry and craft; art and the public; and personal and societal themes.

Participants: Faig Ahmed, Zarina Bhimji, Thomas Boland, Marie Julia Bollansée, Célio Braga, Tiffany Chung, Julie Cockburn, Kyriaki Costa, Ana de la Cueva, Yael Davids, Shezad Dawood, Glucklya, Nicholas Hlobo, Merel Karhof, Aisha Khalid, Fransje Killaars, Kimsooja, Monali Meher, Christien Meindertsma, Almagul Menlibayeva, Floor Nijdeken, Barbara Polderman, Saad Qureshi, Berend Strik, Lin Tianmiao, Remco Torenbosch




The exhibition is multidisciplinary and includes installations, video works, wall hangings and standing objects, some of which are interactive. Thus visitors will be able to make a stitch on the embroidery hoop Crossover Collective (2013) by Floor Nijdeken(1981, Apeldoorn) and get to know Internet ‘cross-links’ in contemporary culture in Thomas Boland’s (1987, Apeldoorn) project which links 40 ‘hotspots’ in Arnhem with each other and with Museum Arnhem: wireless.



Young Talent meetings,
Akademie van Kunsten (KNAW)



KNAW, Amsterdam

2014 2015
Trippenhuis




Trippenhuis, Amsterdam, The Netherlands


Meetings with young talent during 2014 2015.

The Society will give artists a place to share ideas with professionals in science and other artistic disciplines. They will focus on the role of the arts in society and the relationship between science and the arts. The Society is the only platform where individual artists can express their views. The Society of Arts, which was founded in part at the instigation of Jet Bussemaker, Dutch Minister of Education, Culture and Science, has been established for a period of at least three and a half years.




The first set of members was nominated by the publicly funded cultural funds and by members of the Royal Academy and The Young Academy. A committee of Royal Academy members made the final selection, based on expert recommendations from the world of art and culture. Efforts were made to select members from across the artistic disciplines. From this point forward, the Society of Arts will select its own members. The number of members will increase to approximately fifty in the years ahead.

Recent:

A talk between Patricia Reed
and Remco Torenbosch


Motto, Berlin

June 14, 2014
Motto Berlin bookstore



Motto Berlin


In the context of the intensive research into the history of the European Flag, opening up intriguing discussion on the changing socio-economics of EU nations, the disappearance of once booming textile industries and the strong individual identities of a union in flux.

Speakers: Patricia Reed, Remco Torenbosch



Artist and writer Patricia Reed (b. 1977, Canada) lives and works in Berlin. The focus of her artistic and textual practice is the contingency of normality. The play with the plasticity of the normal, both conceptually and materially, constitutes the foundation of her practice.



The Story Behind,
European Contextualisation



Nogueras Blanchard, Barcelona
March 20 — April 25, 2014
Curator: Direlia Lazo




Nogueras Blanchard, Barcelona
, Spain

European contextualisation is part of an ongoing investigation into the history and production of the blue flag of the European Union designed by Arsène Heitz and Paul Lèvy in 1955. The presentation shows a collection of textile fabrics made in the European blue color code by the still existing weaving mills in the European Union. Although the color code for the EU flags is mandated, because of the differing production processes in each country and at each mil, it can still vary, resulting in a wide diversity of blue tints, as seen in this collection.

According to Torenbosch, these interpretations are a striking metaphor for the more recent European situation: “The idea of Europe is not a collective concept, and it certainly can not be defined. Each member country has different ideas about its meaning… The color differences reflect the diversity in expectations and visions.”

Participant: Remco Torenbosch

Previous participants: Lisa Oppenheim, Tatiana Mesa, Haris Epaminnda, Francesco Arena, Christopher Knowles, Tris Vonna-Michell
, Danh Vo



The Story Behind is an extended group exhibition articulated in a series of several individual presentations of an artwork. The project will focus on those artistic projects in which the story or reference– be it fictional or real– plays a central role, conceptually or formally, and is crucial to understand and fully appreciate the artist’s proposal.

A large part of contemporary art practice is based on the telling of it, whether through the conceptualization of intentions that might not be noticeable from just looking at the piece or through the description of the underlying work processes that are crucial in the understanding of the works, or also through the artist’s own interpretations that give way to a specific reading of his or her pieces. In any case, the recou- nting of a piece, meditated or spontaneous, influences our perception of it.




A talk between Max Andrews (Latitudes) and Remco Torenbosch organised by Nogueras Blanchard in collaboration with Latitudes

Fundació Antoni Tàpies Library
March 18, 2014
Curator: Direlia Lazo




Fundació Antoni Tàpies Library, Barcelona
, Spain

In the context of the solo exhibition European Contextualisation at NoguerasBlanchard, the gallery has organised the book launch of Remco Torenbosch's most recent publication 'European contextualising in analytical sociology and ethnographical representation on history and present' (Black Dog Publishing, 2014) at the library of Fundació Tàpies. The exhibition is part of the exhibition cycle 'The Story Behind' curated by Direlia Lazo. This event consists of a talk between Max Andrews (Latitudes) and Remco Torenbosch.

Latitudes is an independent curatorial office initiated in April 2005 by Max Andrews and Mariana Cánepa Luna, that works in an international context from and in Barcelona, Spain. We initiate and develop contemporary art projects in association with institutions and collaborate with artists in productions encompassing a range of organisational forms and scales: genres of display and presentation; editorial practice and publication; forms of assembly, hosting and programming; as well as theoretical and interpretative contexts.

Speakers: Max Andrews (Latitudes),
Remco Torenbosch




This publication profiles the documents, design proposals and written correspondence between Heitz, Lévy, and further collaborators they would form the painstakingly diplomatic development of an iconic vexillological moment.

As part of the book's research, a collection of fabric monochromes woven by weavers from all 28 member states of the EU in th base colour of the flag was compiled. These collated monochromes as such become a map themselves of the socio-economic shift within EU member communities, an embodiment of the disappearing textile industries of Europe.





Lecture by Paul O’Neill and Remco Torenbosch (Q&A with Guus van Engelshoven)

de Appel arts centre, Amsterdam
January 5, 2014
Coordinator: Guus van Engelshoven



'European contextualising in analytical sociology and ethnographical representation on history and
the present’

On January 5th 2014, de Appel arts centre welcomes two guests: Remco Torenbosch, artist from the Prix de Rome exhibition and curator, writer, artist, and educator Paul O’Neill.

Remco Torenbosch will present his publication part of the research for his work in the Prix de Rome exhibition: European Contextualising in Analytical Sociology and Ethnographical Representation on History and the Present, 2013. With contributions by Charles Esche, Mihnea Mircan and the Council of Europe Strasbourg. Published by Black Dog Publishing London

Paul O'Neill will present the curatorial anthology Curating Subjects (2007), Curating and the Educational Turn (2010) and Curating Research (2014), published by de Appel and Open Editions (Amsterdam and London). With this series of theoretical publications, de Appel arts centre aims to share the specific knowledge on curatorial practice taught in the Curatorial Programme with a broader audience. On the occasion of the publication of Curating Research, Paul O’Neill will talk about the history of the series and the relations between the different publications.

Speakers: Paul O’Neill, Remco Torenbosch




Paul O’Neill is currently Director of the Graduate Program in Curatorial Studies at the Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College, New York. He is international tutor of the de Appel Curatorial Programme, Amsterdam, and international research fellow with The Graduate School of Creative Arts and Media, Dublin. O’Neill is author of Locating the Producers: Durational Approaches to Public Art (Amsterdam, Valiz, 2011), edited with Claire Doherty. He recently completed the authored book The Culture of Curating, the Curating of Culture(s), (Cambridge, The MIT Press, 2012).



Studium Generale,
A lecture on engagement


AKV|St.Joost, Breda
March 27, 2014
Coordinator: Fine Arts Department



AKV|St.Joost, Breda, the Netherlands

Engagement. There is no clear official definition of what constituted a Studium generale. The term Studium generale first appeared at the beginning of the 13th century, out of customary usage, and simply meant a place where students from everywhere were welcome (not merely those of the local district or region)

Speakers: Hans den Hartog Jager, Max Bruinsma, Joost Conijn, Sander van Bussel, Remco Torenbosch, Michael Tedja, Martine de Wit (DUS architects), Albo Helm, Lydia Schouten, Jean-Marc van Tol (fokke en sukke), Herman van Bostelen, Pepijn Zurburg (designpolitie), Bas Vroege, Thomas Kuijpers, Yuri Veerman, Ben Krewinkel, Pepe Heykoop, Femke Herregraven, Marc Bijl, Marc Schmidt, Arne Hendriks, Annie Fletcher



Professor and Director Gérard van Dinther began his first class at the ‘Académie Impériale et Royale de Peinture, Sculpture et Architecture’ (Royal and Imperial Academy of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture) in ’s-Hertogenbosch on 1 October 1812. This marked the start of the art academy that is now known as the School of Fine Art and Design|St.Joost. Although the first drawing school in Breda dates back to 1825, the foundations for what used to be St.Joost were not laid until 1945. It was in this year that the ‘Vrije School van Beeldende Kunst’ (Free Academy of Visual Art) was set up by the artists Dio Rovers, Gerrit de Morée and Niel Steenbergen. The merger in 2004 of Hogeschool Brabant and Hogeschool ’s-Hertogenbosch saw the School of Fine Art and Design (AKV, Akademie voor Kunst en Vormgeving ’s-Hertogenbosch) and St.Joost (the art academy in Breda) become one. This is how the School of Fine Art and Design|St.Joost became part of Avans University of Applied Sciences.



Prix de Rome 2013



de Appel arts centre, Amsterdam
October 25, 2013 January 26, 2014
Organisation: Mondriaan Fund



de Appel arts centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands

The Prix de Rome is the oldest and most prestigious award in the Netherlands for artists under the age of 40. The award dates back to 1808 when Louis Napoleon introduced the Prix de Rome in the Netherlands to promote the arts. Although the award adopted various guises over the years, the aim has always been to trace talented artists and promote their further development and visibility. The Mondriaan Fund has organised the award since January 2013. The award and the organisation are funded by the Mondriaan Fund. The four selected artists, together with 46 other artists, were nominated by a wide group of scouts and then chosen by an international jury. Each artist presents very different but also subtly related interests and creates art which both inspires and challenges.

The jury consists of Kathleen Bühler (curator at the Museum of Fine Arts Bern), Ann Goldstein (director at the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam), Nicoline van Harskamp (artist and winner of the Prix de Rome 2009), Navid Nuur (artist) and Domeniek Ruyters (editor in chief of Metropolis M).

Participants: Christian Friedrich, Falke Pisano, Remco Torenbosch, Ola Vasiljeva



On 26 October, an exhibition opened in de Appel arts centre in Amsterdam featuring the work of four artists who have been nominated for the Prix de Rome 2013. Christian Friedrich, Falke Pisano, Remco Torenbosch and Ola Vasiljeva created new work which was assessed by the international jury. The exhibition was on show until 26 January 2014.




Remco Torenbosch
Miner (II)
50 GH/s Butterfly Labs ASIC miner, partially overwritten harddisk with information of the mining industry
24,7 x 12,7 x 12,7 cm
2014


Remco Torenbosch
Europa
Tixtile
Dimensions variable
2013 -