<h2>Remco Torenbosch</h2>
Upcoming:

Threads
↳ Museum Arnhem, Arnhem


Threads will feature works from more than 20 international artists and designers in which the medium of thread or textiles play a prominent role. Their work can be seen as a metaphor for the ‘interweaving’ of artistry and craft; art and the public; and personal and societal themes.



Museum Arnhem, Arnhem, the Netherlands


Participants: Faig Ahmed, Zarina Bhimji, Thomas Boland, Marie Julia Bollansée, Célio Braga, Tiffany Chung, Julie Cockburn, Kyriaki Costa, Ana de la Cueva, Yael Davids, Shezad Dawood, Glucklya, Nicholas Hlobo, Merel Karhof, Aisha Khalid, Fransje Killaars, Kimsooja, Monali Meher, Christien Meindertsma, Almagul Menlibayeva, Floor Nijdeken, Barbara Polderman, Saad Qureshi, Berend Strik, Lin Tianmiao, Remco Torenbosch

Curator: Mirjam Westen

Museum Arnhem, Arnhem
March 15 — Augustus 17, 2014




The exhibition is multidisciplinary and includes installations, video works, wall hangings and standing objects, some of which are interactive. Thus visitors will be able to make a stitch on the embroidery hoop Crossover Collective (2013) by Floor Nijdeken(1981, Apeldoorn) and get to know Internet ‘cross-links’ in contemporary culture in Thomas Boland’s (1987, Apeldoorn) project which links 40 ‘hotspots’ in Arnhem with each other and with Museum Arnhem: wireless.



Bookpresentation: organised by Nogueras Blanchard in collaboration with Latitudes, Barcelona
↳ Fundació Antoni Tàpies Library, Barcelona

European Contextualising in Analytical Sociology and Ethnographical Representation on History and the Present. With contributions by Charles Esche, Mihnea Mircan and the Council of Europe Strasbourg. Published by Black Dog Publishing London



Fundació Antoni Tàpies Library, Barcelona
, Spain

This publication profiles the documents, design proposals and written correspondence between Heitz, Lévy, and further collaborators they would form the painstakingly diplomatic development of an iconic vexillological moment.

Participant: Latitudes Barcelona, Remco Torenbosch

Organised by Nogueras Blanchard in collaboration with Latitudes, Barcelona
Curator: Direlia Lazo

Fundació Antoni Tàpies Library, Barcelona
March 18, 2014, 17:30




As part of the book's research, a collection of fabric monochromes woven by weavers from all 28 member states of the EU in th base colour of the flag was compiled. These collated monochromes as such become a map themselves of the socio-economic shift within EU member communities, an embodiment of the disappearing textile industries of Europe



The Story Behind | European Contextualisation
↳ Nogueras Blanchard Project Space, Barcelona

The Story Behind is an extended group exhibition articulated in a series of several individual presentations of an artwork. The project will focus on those artistic projects in which the story or reference– be it fictional or real– plays a central role, conceptually or formally, and is crucial to understand and fully appreciate the artist’s proposal.



NoguerasBlanchard Project Space, Barcelona
, Spain

Participant: Remco Torenbosch

Earlier participants of The Story Behind project: Lisa Oppenheim, Tatiana Mesa, Haris Epaminonda, Francesco Arena, Christopher Knowles, Tris Vonna-Michell


Curator: Direlia Lazo

Nogueras Blanchard Project Space, Barcelona
March 20 — April, 2014

Opening: March 20, 2014, 19.00




A large part of contemporary art practice is based on the telling of it, whether through the conceptualization of intentions that might not be noticeable from just looking at the piece or through the description of the underlying work processes that are crucial in the understanding of the works, or also through the artist’s own interpretations that give way to a specific reading of his or her pieces. In any case, the recou- nting of a piece, meditated or spontaneous, influences our perception of it.





Size Matters, In relation to Minimalism
↳ Fort Vijfhuizen, Vijfhuizen


Objectivity, seriality, reproducibility and participation of these aspects have been given a new meaning. In the work of the artists in this exhibition In particular, the physical aspect of Minimal Art, the 'Gestalt', plays a crucial role. In various works The scheme of the works in this exhibition compared with the characteristic areas of the Arts Fort. The visitors complete if it were the work, it's their body that determines the size of things.



Fort Vijfhuizen, Vijfhuizen, the Netherlands


Participant: Eva Berendes, Lucas Lenglet, Navid Nuur, Esther Stocker, Remco Torenbosch

Curator: Nathalie Zonnenberg


Fort Vijfhuizen, Vijfhuizen
July 6 — August 31, 2014




Fort at Vijfhuizen is part of the sector Locks in the Stelling van Amsterdam. It was the task of this fort to the ring canal and embankment of the Haarlemmermeer polder and the remaining dry strip of land along the western edge of the polder, to defend.

Fort at Vijfhuizen is based on the design model 'A' from 1897, where the retractable turrets had an independent place on the flank angles. Is also a so-called Genius Shed on site. This metal Genie Shed is the only surviving example of this type. In the nearby Geniedijk is a secondary battery.



Blue Times
↳ Kunsthalle Wien, Vienna


Any history of colour is, above all, a social history. How can we tell our story through the filter of the colour blue? First known for its preciousness and the scarcity of the lapis lazuli pigment, the history of the colour blue is one that has undergone various changes in meanings over time:



Kunsthalle Wien
, Vienna, Austria

From blue jeans and blue-collar workers, the colour of the European Union and United Nations, to becoming a symbol for freedom and colouring our melancholy with expressions such as feeling blue.

Curators: Amira Gad, Nicolaus Schafhausen

Kunsthalle Wien, Vienna
October 3, 2014 — January 11, 2015




The history of Kunsthalle Wien starts with a temporary building. Planned by Adolf Krischanitz as a temporary construction container, the Kunsthalle Wien at Karlsplatz opened in 1992. Originally quite controversial, the yellow container construction soon became a landmark and influenced both the local art and exhibition scene.

Now:

European contextualising (...) (publication)
↳ Black Dog Publishing, London

This publication profiles the documents, design proposals and written correspondence between Heitz, Lévy, and further collaborators they would form the painstakingly diplomatic development of an iconic vexillological moment.



'European contextualising in analytical sociology and ethnographical representation on history and
the present’
, 2014


As part of the book's research, a collection of fabric monochromes woven by weavers from all 28 member states of the EU in th base colour of the flag was compiled. These collated monochromes as such become a map themselves of the socio-economic
shift within EU member communities, an embodiment of the disappearing textile industries of Europe.



Author/Editor: Remco Torenbosch
Contributors: Charles Esche, Mihnea Mircan, Council of Europe Archive

Paperback: 244 pages
Publisher: Black Dog Publishing London
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1908966696
ISBN-13: 978-1908966698

Images

Order here



Originally conceived for the Council of Europe, the successful design of the flag was later adopted by the European Union in 1985 whilst under the moniker of the European Economic Community. Designed by Arsene Heitz, a French draughtsman at the CoE, and Paul Levy, a Jewish-Belgian Holocaust survivor who worked for many years as the council's Director of Information, the finalised design was presented to the CoE in 1955 at its headquarters in Strasbourg, Heitz's hometown.


Recent:

Studium Generale
↳ AKV|St.Joost, Breda


Engagement. There is no clear official definition of what constituted a Studium generale. The term Studium generale first appeared at the beginning of the 13th century, out of customary usage, and simply meant a place where students from everywhere were welcome (not merely those of the local district or region)



AKV|St.Joost, Breda, the Netherlands

Speakers: Hans den Hartog Jager, Max Bruinsma, Joost Conijn, Sander van Bussel, Remco Torenbosch, Michael Tedja, Martine de Wit (DUS architects), Albo Helm, Lydia Schouten, Jean-Marc van Tol (fokke en sukke), Herman van Bostelen, Pepijn Zurburg (designpolitie), Bas Vroege, Thomas Kuijpers, Yuri Veerman, Ben Krewinkel, Pepe Heykoop, Femke Herregraven, Marc Bijl, Marc Schmidt, Arne Hendriks, Annie Fletcher

AKV|St Joost, Breda, The Netherlands
March 27, 2014 3 — 4 pm




Professor and Director Gérard van Dinther began his first class at the ‘Académie Impériale et Royale de Peinture, Sculpture et Architecture’ (Royal and Imperial Academy of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture) in ’s-Hertogenbosch on 1 October 1812. This marked the start of the art academy that is now known as the School of Fine Art and Design|St.Joost.

Although the first drawing school in Breda dates back to 1825, the foundations for what used to be St.Joost were not laid until 1945. It was in this year that the ‘Vrije School van Beeldende Kunst’ (Free Academy of Visual Art) was set up by the artists Dio Rovers, Gerrit de Morée and Niel Steenbergen. The merger in 2004 of Hogeschool Brabant and Hogeschool ’s-Hertogenbosch saw the School of Fine Art and Design (AKV, Akademie voor Kunst en Vormgeving ’s-Hertogenbosch) and St.Joost (the art academy in Breda) become one. This is how the School of Fine Art and Design|St.Joost became part of Avans University of Applied Sciences.

Book presentation: Paul O’Neill and
Remco Torenbosch
↳ de Appel, Amsterdam


On January 5th 2014, de Appel arts centre welcomes two guests: Remco Torenbosch, artist from the Prix de Rome exhibition and curator, writer, artist, and educator Paul O’Neill.



'European contextualising in analytical sociology and ethnographical representation on history and
the present’


Remco Torenbosch will present his publication part of the research for his work in the Prix de Rome exhibition: European Contextualising in Analytical Sociology and Ethnographical Representation on History and the Present, 2013. With contributions by Charles Esche, Mihnea Mircan and the Council of Europe Strasbourg. Published by Black Dog Publishing London

Paul O'Neill will present the curatorial anthology Curating Subjects (2007), Curating and the Educational Turn (2010) and Curating Research (2014), published by de Appel and Open Editions (Amsterdam and London). With this series of theoretical publications, de Appel arts centre aims to share the specific knowledge on curatorial practice taught in the Curatorial Programme with a broader audience. On the occasion of the publication of Curating Research, Paul O’Neill will talk about the history of the series and the relations between the different publications.

Speakers: Paul O’Neill, Remco Torenbosch

de Appel, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
January 5, 2014
3
— 5 pm



Paul O’Neill is currently Director of the Graduate Program in Curatorial Studies at the Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College, New York. He is international tutor of the de Appel Curatorial Programme, Amsterdam, and international research fellow with The Graduate School of Creative Arts and Media, Dublin. O’Neill is author of Locating the Producers: Durational Approaches to Public Art (Amsterdam, Valiz, 2011), edited with Claire Doherty. He recently completed the authored book The Culture of Curating, the Curating of Culture(s), (Cambridge, The MIT Press, 2012).

Prix de Rome (publication)
nai010 publishers

"The publication Prix de Rome 2013 presents portraits of four talented young artists nominated for the prestigious Prix de Rome Award. Christian Friedrich, Falke Pisano, Remco Torenbosch and Ola Vasiljeva were selected by an international jury because their work is surprising, enthralling and makes you hungry for more."




Prix de Rome Catalogue by nai010 publishers, 2013


All four artists specialize in presentations based on theory and research. For the Prix de Rome they each created a new work. Besides an introduction by Hans den Hartog Jager, the nominated artists are portrayed by Stefan Kuiper and Roos van der Lint.

Publication Prix de Rome 2013
nai010 uitgevers, 2013
Design: Lesley Moore
ISBN 978-94-6208-105-5

Images

Order here




The Prix de Rome is the Netherlands’ oldest, most important prize for visual artists under 40. The award dates back to 1808 when Louis Napoleon introduced the Prix de Rome in the Netherlands to promote the arts. Although the award has regularly been renewed, the aim is still to trace talented artists and encourage them to develop and increase their visibility. Since January 2013, the award has been organised and financed by the Mondriaan Fund.

The jury, chaired by Birgit Donker (director of the Mondriaan Fund), comprises Kathleen Bühler (curator of the Kunstmuseum Bern), Ann Goldstein (director of the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam), Nicoline van Harskamp (artist and Prix de Rome winner in 2009), Navid Nuur (artist) and Domeniek Ruyters (editor-in-chief of Metropolis M).

The final presentation of the four nominated artists Falke Pisano, Christian Friedrich, Remco Torenbosch and Ola Vasiljeva is on display until 26 January in the Appel arts centre, Prins Hendrikkade 142 in Amsterdam.

Round-table Discussion
↳ Palazzo Giustinian Lolin, Venezia, Italy
     La Biennale di Venezia 2013


Speaker at the 'Round-table Discussion' during the preview of the the 55th International Art Exhibition - La Biennale di Venezia 2013. Presented by The Mondrian Fund and the Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands in Rome at Palazzo Giustinian Lolin,Venezia, Italy.



Palazzo Giustinian Lolin,Venezia, Italy


Speakers: Rossella Biscotti and Giorgio Andreotta Calò (Italian artists who work in the Netherlands), Gianfranco Maraniello (director of Museo d'Arte Moderna di Bologna and curator of important exhibitions with Dutch artists), Jan Dibbets and Remco Torenbosch (Dutch artists) and Lorenzo Benedetti (curator Dutch entry). In the presence of Michiel den Hond, Ambassador of the Kingdom of the Netherlands. Moderator: Ann Demeester (director of de Appel arts centre in Amsterdam).

The discussion will take a close look at the artistic ties that exist between Italy and the Netherlands - from both a historical and comtemporary perspective - and will include representatives from several generations of Italians and Dutch artists and curators.

Participants: Rossella Biscotti, Giorgio Andreotta Calò, Gianfranco Maraniello, Jan Dibbets, Remco Torenbosch, Lorenzo Benedetti, Ann Demeester

Palazzo Giustinian Lolin,Venezia;
55th International Art Exhibition - La Biennale di Venezia 2013
, Venice, Italy
May 30, 2013




The Mondrian Fund and the Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands in Rome are pleased to invite you to a Round-table Discussion during the preview days of the 55th International Art Exhibition - La Biennale di Venezia 2013. The direct occasion for this event are two presentations that will be held at the upcoming Venice Biennale: Mark Manders' exhibition in the Dutch Pavilion, curated by the Italian curator Lorenzo Benedetti (director De Vleeshal, Middelburg); and Germano Celant's re-staging by the Fondazione Prada of the groundbreaking exhibition Live in Your Head: When Attitudes Become Form, organised in 1969 by Herald Szeemann in Kunsthalle Bern.

Against Interpretation, a project that builds upon abstract relations in the public domain
San Serriffe, Amsterdam


Against Interpretation, a project that builds upon abstract relations in the public domain (a collaboration between Onomatopee and Whatspace)



San Serriffe (Island)

‘Abstraction is the opposite of information’ states the critic/observer Jan Verwoert. Abstraction can be a way to return to the image, whereby the formal aspects of the image determine its content and its power. This experiment is being carried out by artists who use abstraction in a contemporary fashion. They use tradition freely, but also take on pop culture - doing so self-consciously, and aiming, through abstraction, to exude their own erotics.

Participants: Koen Delaere (NL), Cheryl Donegan (USA), Harm van den Dorpel (NL), Wade Guyton (USA), Bas van den Hurk (NL), Sandra Kranich (GER), Alexandra Leykauf (GER), Tom Meacham (USA), Rory Pilgrim (UK), Remco Torenbosch (NL), Joelle Tuerlinckx (B), Evi Vingerling (NL), Wendy White (USA), Jens Wolf (DE)

San Serriffe, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
June 22, 2013




The information overload races on; in public space it’s more like overkill. Whatspace wants to draw from our relationship to information in public space - to offer us the consecutive possibilities of confrontation, tranquillity and renewed concentration - and they want to do so experimentally, through the power of abstract art. Not only do they want to make this power manifest, they also want to grasp hold of it. Through approaching information exchange experimentally, as an intensely loaded erotics which manifests in and through abstract art, this project becomes fascinating - both for people interested in the powers of abstraction and for those who wish to sharpen their perception of things as they are. Interpretation is the revenge of the intellect (the critic) upon art’ states the famous North American writer, critic and essayist, Susan Sontag, in the essay ‘Against Interpretation’. She suggests that ‘we must learn to see more, to hear more, to feel more’. To achieve a more sensitive reading of the work requires a good listener. Sontag therefore makes the plea, ‘in place of a hermeneutics we need an erotics of art.’

Research: De optimo rei publicae statu deque nova insula Utopia at International Institute of Social History (IISH)



It is variously rendered On the Best State of a Republic and on the New Island of Utopia, Concerning the Highest State of the Republic and the New Island Utopia, On the Best State of a Commonwealth and on the New Island of Utopia, Concerning the Best Condition of the Commonwealth and the New Island of Utopia, On the Best Kind of a Republic and About the New Island of Utopia, About the Best State of a Commonwealth and the New Island of Utopia, etc. The original name was even longer: Libellus vere aureus, nec minus salutaris quam festivus, de optimo rei publicae statu deque nova insula Utopia. This translates, "A truly golden little book, no less beneficial than entertaining, of a republic's best state and of the new island Utopia".


The title De optimo rei publicae statu deque nova insula Utopia literally translates, "Of a republic's best state and of the new island Utopia".

The work begins with written correspondence between Thomas More and several people he had met on the continent: Peter Gilles, town clerk of Antwerp, and Jerome de Busleyden, counselor to Charles V. More chose these letters, which are communications between actual people, to further the plausibility of his fictional land. In the same spirit, these letters also include a specimen of the Utopian alphabet and its poetry. The letters also explain the lack of widespread travel to Utopia; during the first mention of the land, someone had coughed during announcement of the exact longitude and latitude.


The first book tells of the traveler Raphael Hythloday, to whom More is introduced in Antwerp, and it also explores the subject of how best to counsel a prince, a popular topic at the time. The first discussions with Raphael allow him to discuss some of the modern ills affecting Europe such as the tendency of kings to start wars and the subsequent bleeding away of money on fruitless endeavours. He also criticises the use of execution to punish theft saying that thieves might as well murder whom they rob, to remove witnesses, if the punishment is going to be the same. He lays most of the problems of theft on the practice of enclosure—the enclosing of common land—and the subsequent poverty and starvation of people who are denied access to land because of sheep farming.
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Monocrystalline Polycrystalline



Monocrystalline Polycrystalline, Polysilicon has many applications in VLSI manufacturing. One of its primary uses is as gate electrode material for MOS devices. A polysilicon gate's electrical conductivity may be increased by depositing a metal (such as tungsten) or a metal silicide (such as tungsten silicide) over the gate.


    

Polycrystalline silicon

Growth of single crystals and its reproducibility in industrial applications, polycrystalline and amorphous silicon, epitaxial technologies and thin films, crystal defects, impurities and doping, various processes for micro- and nano-structuring, materials requirements from the vantage point of the users in the fields of microelectronics, power electronics, optoelectronics, and micromechanics, interfaces to other materials such as III-V compounds.



Monocrystalline silicon is also used in the manufacturing of high performance solar cells. Since, however, solar cells are less demanding than microelectronics for as concerns structural imperfections, monocrystaline solar grade (Sog-Si) is often used, single crystal is also often replaced by the cheaper polycrystalline or multicrystalline silicon. Monocrystalline solar cells can achieve 17% efficiency whereas other types of less expensive cells including thin film and polycrystalline are only capable of achieving around 10% efficiency

Polysilicon has many applications in VLSI manufacturing. One of its primary uses is as gate electrode material for MOS devices. A polysilicon gate's electrical conductivity may be increased by depositing a metal (such as tungsten) or a metal silicide (such as tungsten silicide) over the gate. Polysilicon may also be employed as a resistor, a conductor, or as an ohmic contact for shallow junctions, with the desired electrical conductivity attained by doping the polysilicon material.

European contextualising in analytical sociology and ethnographical representation on history and the present



‘European contextualising in analytical sociology and ethnographical representation on history and the present’ (studio view, 2012)


The European flag; originally designed by Arsène Heitz (a French draughtsman, born in Strasbourg and worked at the Council of Europe) and Paul Lévy (a Belgium born Jewish Holocaust survivor who worked for many years as Director of Information at the Council of Europe) was presented in 1955 at The Council of Europe in Strasbourg.

In the physical sense, the European blue colour functions as a monochrome within a modernist tradition with its purity laws, it’s longing for transcendence and an optimistic believe in the utopian potential. Simultaneously in a psychological sense the blue fabric functions as a blue-screen (chroma key, used in the TV and movie industry) where the broad and critical thoughts about Europe and the European Union can be projected on, an idea that in both cases is a parallel to the so-called ‘European collective thought’. Fundamental to this research is displaying the monochromes as ethnographical documents that are mapping the economic and social changes of many local communities by embodying an ethnographic and sociological value as remnants from the various disappearing or already disappeared textile industries of Europe.



The research ‘European contextualising in analytical sociology and ethnographical representation on history and the present’ started at the end of 2011. Components of this research are shown in the solo exhibition EUROPA at GAMeC - Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art in Bergamo, Italy. And in the group exhibition Autumn of Modernism curated by Lorenzo Benedetti and took place at De Vleeshal and at the Temporary Gallery in Cologne, Germany.


The flag of Europe consists of a circle of 12 golden (yellow) stars on an azure background. It is the flag and emblem of the Council of Europe (CoE) and the European Union (EU). It is also often used to indicate eurozone countries, and, more loosely, to represent the continent of Europe or the countries of Europe independent of any of these institutions. The number of stars does not vary according to the members of either organisation as they are intended to represent all the peoples of Europe, even those outside the EU, but inside the CoE. The flag was designed by Arsène Heitz and Paul Lévy in 1955 for the CoE as its symbol, and the CoE urged it to be adopted by other organisations. In 1985 the EU, which was then the European Economic Community (EEC), adopted it as its own flag (having had no flag of its own before) at the initiative of the European Parliament. The flag is not mentioned in the EU's treaties, its incorporation being dropped along with the European Constitution, but it is formally adopted in law. Despite its being the flag of two separate organisations, it is often more associated with the EU due to the EU's higher profile and heavy usage of the emblem. The flag has also been used to represent Europe in sporting events and as a pro-democracy banner outside the Union.[5] It has partly inspired other flags, such as those of other European organisations and those of states where the EU has been heavily involved (such as Bosnia and Herzegovina and Kosovo).
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Salārium



Salt blocks. Within the Roman Empire or (later) medieval and pre-industrial Europe and its mercantile colonies, salaried employment appears to have been relatively rare and mostly limited to servants and higher status roles, especially in government service.

Similarly, the Roman word salarium linked employment, salt and soldiers, but the exact link is very clear. The latest common theory is that the word soldier itself comes from the Latin sal dare (to give salt), but previous theories were on the same ground. Alternatively, the Roman historian Pliny the Elder stated as an aside in his Natural History's discussion of sea water, that "[I]n Rome. . .the soldier's pay was originally salt and the word salary derives from it...". Others note that soldier more likely derives from the gold solidus, with which soldiers were known to have been paid, and maintain instead that the salarium was either an allowance for the purchase of salt or the price of having soldiers conquer salt supplies and guard the Salt Roads (Via Salaria) that led to Rome.



Within the Roman Empire or (later) medieval and pre-industrial Europe and its mercantile colonies, salaried employment appears to have been relatively rare and mostly limited to servants and higher status roles, especially in government service.

Other common alternative models of work included self- or co-operative employment, as with masters in artisan guilds, who often had salaried assistants, or corporate work and ownership, as with medieval universities and monasteries.



While people have used canning and artificial refrigeration to preserve food for the last hundred years or so, salt has been the best-known food preservative, especially for meat, for many thousands of years. A very ancient saltworks operation has been discovered at the Poiana Slatinei archaeological site next to a salt spring in Lunca, Neamţ County, Romania. Evidence indicates that Neolithic people of the Precucuteni Culture were boiling the salt-laden spring water through the process of briquetage to extract the salt as far back as 6050 BC. The salt extracted from this operation may have had a direct correlation to the rapid growth of this society's population soon after its initial production began. The harvest of salt from the surface of Xiechi Lake near Yuncheng in Shanxi, China dates back to at least 6000 BC, making it one of the oldest verifiable saltworks.
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Projects:
Radio Calling
↳ Tent, Rotterdam, The Netherlands




Radio Calling, Tent Rotterdam


The Radio Calling weekend event explores in a mini-symposium, masterclasses, and live radio performances, radio as a tool, platform, and medium for contemporary art. How can the medium contribute to the production and perception of a work of art?

Sunday's live radio performances, presented and recorded in front of an audience, include Jonas Lund, Koen Taselaar and Remco Torenbosch and proposals selected through the open call. The weekend ends with a radio performance from Camden Arts Centre in London by the Rotterdam artist Jay Tan. Live stream on This is Tomorrow.



Participants: Jay Tan, Jonas Lund, Remco Torenbosch, Koen Taselaar, Sarah Tripp

Curator: Jesse van Oosten

Tent, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
December 15, 2013




he Radio Calling weekend event explores various forms of radio in contemporary art through live radio performances, masterclasses and a mini-symposium. How can the medium contribute to the production and perception of a work of art? Why is the use of radio increasingly popular among artists? Radio Residencies, London and Rotterdam Radio Calling launches Radio Residencies, a new long-term partnership between TENT and Camden Arts Centre in London. Both institutions have invited an artist to produce a new performance work in which the possibilities of live performance and broadcasting are examined. The London artist Jeremy Evans and the Rotterdam artist Jay Tan are the first artists to participate in the residency project.

Remco Torenbosch, Nickel van Duijvenboden
↳ Brak/Duende, Rotterdam, The Netherlands




Cotton Green Bombay, 1920


Within this exhibition Remco Torenbosch is showing components of his study on the concept of Europe entitled: European Conceptualization in analytical philosophy on history and present. The works that have emerged from this study are a reflection of the political, social and economic changes the European Union has undergone since the founding and the underlying accompanying utopian ideologies during the formation.


Participants: Nickel van Duijvenboden, Remco Torenbosch

Curator: Jack Segbar


Brak/Duende, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
October 13 — October 21, 2012




One element in this research is the creation of a collection fabric samples in the blue colour of the European flag, gathered in the countries of the European Union. With this collection of fabric samples Torenbosch is questioning if the collection can be ultimately considered as cultural objects and possibly can represent an ethnographic value as remnants from the various disappearing local textile industries, which results into wide social and economic changes. Within the colour differences between the fabric samples, this collection also underlines the European differences by country and it’s standard idea about the European blue. In the physical sense, the European blue colour functions as a monochrome within a modernist tradition with its purity laws, its longing for transcendence and an optimistic believe in the utopian potential. Simultaneously in a psychological sense the blue functions as a blue-screen (chroma key) where the broad and critical thoughts about Europe and the European Union can be projected, an idea that in both cases is a parallel to the so-called European collective thought.

Besides the collection of fabric samples a sound abstraction of the composition Ode to Joy is played several times a day. Ode to Joy is originally a poem written in 1785 by a young Friedrich Schiller and used in 1823 by Ludwig van Beethoven for the final scene in Symphony No. 9. Since 1972 this piece has been the unofficial anthem of Europe and since 1985 officially chosen as the anthem of the European Union. Friedrich Schiller said that he wrote Ode to Joy with too euphoric, megalomaniac and naive eyes of a young man, a statement that shows in retrospect strong similarities with the statements of Robert Schuman and Jean Monnet* during the creation of the European Economic Community; the forerunner of the European Union. For the recording of this piece, Torenbosch collaborated with a composer and recorded it without the backbone instrumental parts of this composition. By abstracting the original composition of Ode to Joy, the piece created a possibility for the listener to fill in the open parts of this so-called 'collective composition’.

The research European conceptualization in analytical philosophy on history and present started at the end of 2011. Components of this research are shown in the solo exhibition EUROPA at GAMeC - Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art in Bergamo, Italy. And in the group exhibition Autumn of Modernism curated by Lorenzo Benedetti and took place at De Vleeshal and at the Temporary Gallery in Cologne, Germany.

Autumn of Modernism II
↳ Temporary Gallery, Cologne, Germany




Installation view of Autumn of Modernism II at the Temporary Gallery Cologne, 2012. Works from left to riight: Martijn in 't Veld, Remco Torenbosch (European conceptualization in analytical philosophy on history and present B), gerlach en koop, Remco Torenbosch (European conceptualization in analytical philosophy on history and present A), Batia Suter. Courtesy of Temporary Gallery, Cologne.


The title of the exhibition was inspired by The Autumn of the Middle Ages, Johan Huizinga’s classic book published in 1919, a study of the forms of life, thought, and art at the end of the Middle Ages. The book shows that the artists of that period achieved their groundbreaking successes precisely because they drew on the past. This gave them a better grasp of the changes occurring all around them.

The explosion of news outlets and ways of consuming the news has made our society very focused on the now, and we sometimes forget to consider the future or the past. Artists try to step out of the present by consulting sources from the past and using them in their art, thus attempting to build bridges to the future.

Participants: Gwenneth Boelens, Piet Dieleman, gerlach en koop, Sara van der Heide, Martijn Hendriks, Bas van den Hurk, Rob Johannesma, Katja Mater, Marc Nagtzaam, Falke Pisano, Roma Publications, Petra Stavast, Batia Suter, Remco Torenbosch, Martijn in ’t Veld

Curator: Lorenzo Benedetti


Temporary Gallery, Cologne, Germany
September 7 — October 28, 2012

Exhibition pictures




One element in this research is the creation of a collection fabric samples in the blue colour of the European flag, gathered in the countries of the European Union. With this collection of fabric samples Torenbosch is questioning if the collection can be ultimately considered as cultural objects and possibly can represent an ethnographic value as remnants from the various disappearing local textile industries, which results into wide social and economic changes. Within the colour differences between the fabric samples, this collection also underlines the European differences by country and it’s standard idea about the European blue. In the physical sense, the European blue colour functions as a monochrome within a modernist tradition with its purity laws, its longing for transcendence and an optimistic believe in the utopian potential. Simultaneously in a psychological sense the blue functions as a blue-screen (chroma key) where the broad and critical thoughts about Europe and the European Union can be projected, an idea that in both cases is a parallel to the so-called European collective thought.

The research European conceptualization in analytical philosophy on history and present started at the end of 2011. Components of this research are shown in the solo exhibition EUROPA at GAMeC - Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art in Bergamo, Italy. And in the group exhibition Autumn of Modernism curated by Lorenzo Benedetti and took place at De Vleeshal and at the Temporary Gallery in Cologne, Germany.
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EUROPA (solo exhibition)
GAMeC, Bergamo, Italy




Detail of the courtyard and glass pavilion of the GAMeC with in the back an outdoor version of European conceptualization in analytical philosophy on history and present C.Courtesy of GAMeC - Galleria d’Arte Moderna e Contemporanea, Bergamo, Italy.

In 1950 the French Foreign Minister Robert Schuman presented a plan for cooperation among European states. Seven years later, the first six countries signed the Treaty of Rome, creating the European Economic Community (EEC), the forerunner of what we now call the European Union. Never in its brief history has the European Union been under as much pressure as it is today.

In the courtyard and glass pavilion of the GAMeC but also in several locations in the city of Bergamo, Remco Torenbosch presents a critical variety of situations and thoughts. The works that are presented are a reflection on the political and socio-economic changes to which Europe has recently been subjected. In this, Torenbosch investigates the language and manifestations through which a community and continent declares, represents and questions itself through the consciousness of contemporary and historical references. Within this research, Torenbosch tries to distil the situation as a return to a more human scale and perspective by underlining the importance of care and action.

Participants: Remco Torenbosch

Curator: Stefano Raimondi

GAMeC, Bergamo, Italy
June 14 — September 30, 2012

Images




EUROPA is the first solo exhibition in an Italian institution of the Dutch artist Remco Torenbosch. It is the result of a three-month residency in Bergamo for the project entitled The Blank Artist in Residence – Fondazione Banca Popolare di Bergamo, which has been conceived by the no-profit association The Blank in collaboration with GAMeC and the Accademia Carrara di Belle Arti of Bergamo and realized thanks to the support of Fondazione Banca Popolare di Bergamo, the Consulate General of the Kingdom of the Netherlands in Milan and the Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands in Rome.
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Autumn of Modernism (catalogue)
↳ Roma Publications




Autumn of Modernism Catalogue by Roma Publications, 2012


Different from a regular exhibition catalogue, this book contains autonomous contributions by 14 artists who where invited by curator Lorenzo Benedetti to take part in the exhibition 'Autumn of Modernism' at De Vleeshal, Middelburg. The contributions somehow respond in an indirect way to the social changes of our day, such as the present economic crisis.

With contributions by: Gwenneth Boelens, Piet Dieleman, gerlach en koop, Sara van der Heide, Martijn Hendriks, Bas van den Hurk, Rob Johannesma, Katja Mater, Marc Nagtzaam, Falke Pisano, Petra Stavast, Batia Suter, Remco Torenbosch, Martijn in 't Veld. And with an introduction by Lorenzo Benedetti.

Roma Publications, 2012
Design: Roger Willems and Louis Lüthi.
ISBN 978 90 77459 79 9


Images



The title of the exhibition was inspired by The Autumn of the Middle Ages, Johan Huizinga’s classic book published in 1919, a study of the forms of life, thought, and art at the end of the Middle Ages. The book shows that the artists of that period achieved their groundbreaking successes precisely because they drew on the past. This gave them a better grasp of the changes occurring all around them.

The explosion of news outlets and ways of consuming the news has made our society very focused on the now, and we sometimes forget to consider the future or the past. Artists try to step out of the present by consulting sources from the past and using them in their art, thus attempting to build bridges to the future.
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Walking Manifesto
↳ Lonno, Italy (part of EUROPA, GAMeC Bergamo)




Walking Manifesto, 2012. Courtesy of GAMeC - Galleria d’Arte Moderna e Contemporanea, Bergamo, Italy

In 1336, Francesco Petrarca undertook a journey to clime the Mont Ventoux. Once he reached the top he read in Augustine's ‘Confessions’ that these acts only lead to one's inner self-neglect. With one foot in the Middle Ages and the other in the Renaissance, Petrarch still hesitated whether he looked out upon the landscape, or inward to his soul.

Walking Manifesto (Via Mercatorum) uses the walk as a starting point of collective thinking and speaking and can be considered as an organic manifesto. The two-hour walk starts from Lonno (Nembro Bergamo) walking over the Via Mercatorum, an old trading route from the Middle Ages that is now a popular walking route and goes through Salmezza (Nembro Bergamo) back to Lonno.

Date: Saturday June 16, 10:00
Address: Parking space at the end of Via Michelangelo Buonarroti, Lonno (Nembro, Bergamo)


Exhibition pictures



EUROPA is the first solo exhibition in an Italian institution of the Dutch artist Remco Torenbosch. It is the result of a three-month residency in Bergamo for the project entitled The Blank Artist in Residence – Fondazione Banca Popolare di Bergamo, which has been conceived by the no-profit association The Blank in collaboration with GAMeC and the Accademia Carrara di Belle Arti of Bergamo and realized thanks to the support of Fondazione Banca Popolare di Bergamo, the Consulate General of the Kingdom of the Netherlands in Milan and the Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands in Rome.

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The Art of Choice
↳ De Vleeshal, Middelburg, The Netherlands




Detail of the work Untitled (B.E.P.), Purchased by De Vleeshal in 2010. Courtesy of De Vleeshal Middelburg. Picture: Leo van Kampen

SBKM/De Vleeshal is in charge of Middelburg’s municipal art collection, which is stored at the MuHKA(Museum of Modern Art in Antwerp). Selections from the more than 150 works are periodically exhibited at De Vleeshal or De Kabinetten van De Vleeshal. For The Art of Choice, a preliminary selection of 36 works was presented to the public for voting.

Participants: Maartje Korstanje, Marlow Moss, Job Koelewijn, Bianca Runge, Marijke van Warmerdam, Liza May Post, Fransje Killaars, Remco Torenbosch, Marinus Boezem, Francesco Arena, Robert Maaskant, Piet Dieleman, Ben Sleeuwenhoek

Curator: the public

De Vleeshal, Middelburg, The Netherlands
July 1 — October 21, 2012




This work was in 2010 on display during the exhibition Fault in Cabinets and was subsequently purchased. Torenbosch refers to his work on the social and economic dynamics of our time, translated into formal structures. Untitled (BEP) is a mobile, a schematic representation of the economic term 'Break Even Point (BEP), when a company or institution no profit and no loss (more) and who thus can grow. De Vleeshal, 2010.
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Against Interpretation
↳ Onomatopee, Eindhoven, The Netherlands




Studioview, 2012

The information overload races on; in public space it’s more like overkill. Whatspace wants to draw from our relationship to information in public space – to offer us the consecutive possibilities of confrontation, tranquillity and renewed concentration – and they want to do so experimentally, through the power of abstract art. Not only do they want to make this power manifest, they also want to grasp hold of it.

Whatspace marks out the underlying game experimentally, as an extensive international poster project in Tilburg’s public space as well as in Onomatopee’s exhibition space. The starting point here is, taking things as they are, in a sensual, sensory manner, consequently freeing the image of the overload of information which adheres to it and which causes the image itself, as carrier of information, to become invisible. Fourteen (inter)national artists have been invited to develop work in the format of a poster especially for this exhibition. Not only does this elicit questions about the role and function of the media in respect to the use of public space, it also challenges the viewer, when confronted with the work, to concentrate fully on the significance of this information.

Participants: Koen Delaere, Cheryl Donegan, Harm van den Dorpel, Wade Guyton, Bas van den Hurk, Sandra Kranich, Alexandra Leykauf, Tom Meacham, Rory Pilgrim, Remco Torenbosch, Joelle Tuerlinckx, Evi Vingerling

Curators: Whatspace, Freek Lomme

Onomatopee, Eindhoven
June 8 — July 15, 2012




Against Interpretation and Other Essays is a collection of essays by Susan Sontag published in 1966. It includes some of Sontag's best-known works, including "On Style," "Notes on 'Camp'," and the titular essay "Against Interpretation." In the last, Sontag argues that in the new critical approach to aesthetics the spiritual importance of art is being replaced by the emphasis on the intellect. Rather than recognizing great creative works as possible sources of energy, she argues, contemporary critics were all too often taking art's transcendental power for granted, and focusing instead on their own intellectually constructed abstractions like "form" and "content." In effect, she wrote, interpretation had become "the intellect's revenge upon art." The essay famously finishes with the words, "in place of a hermeneutics we need an erotics of art".

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Landscape on the Move
↳ SoundArtMuseum (SAM), Rome (virtual), Italy




Installation view of the SoundArtMuseum Archive, 2012. Picture: Leo van Kampen


The Theory of Moral Sentiments is a 1759 book by Adam Smith. It provided the ethical, philosophical, psychological, and methodological underpinnings to Smith's later works, including The Wealth of Nations (1776), which is a reflection on economics at the beginning of the Industrial Revolution and argues that free market economies are more productive and beneficial to their societies. Remco Torenbosch shear within this work only the link to the LibriVox database which hosts free audio books read and runned by volunteers to provide a non-economic (including books on economics) trading situation.


Landscape on the Move will also include the SoundArtMuseum (SAM), a project launched in 2005 as a museum of sound and a place where hundreds of sound-art works by contemporary artists are brought together and exhibited. Many of the sound-art installations in the museum are site-specific, including H. H. Lim’s Daily Music, which has been specially created for Middelburg. As part of the exhibition, a series of new works will be presented to the SAM archives, which will be on display in the exhibition space for consultation by the public. Some of the archives can also be found on the Internet at www.radioartemobile.it, under ‘SoundArtMuseum’.

Participants: Dario D'Aronco, Domenico Mangano, Remco Torenbosch

Curators: Riccardo Giagni, Lorenzo Benedetti,
Cesare Pietroiusti


SoundArtMuseum (SAM), Rome (virtual), Italy
April 1 — June 24, 2012




The Sound Art Museum is an initiative promoted by ZERYNTHIA and RadioArteMobile (RAM), one of the first internet radio stations to discuss the field in between the so called visual arts and sound research. :
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Between Act and Protest: Building The New Economy
↳ Accademia Carrara di Belle Arti Bergamo, Bergamo, Italy




Seminar entitled: Between Act and Protest: Building The New Economy at Accademia Carrara di Belle Arti Bergamo, Bergamo, Italy, 2012


The starting point of the two-day seminar (‘Between Act and Protest: Building The New Economy’) at Accademia Carrara di Belle Arti di Bergamo was to involve the students to take part in the discussion about the economic situation that we are dealing with today. On a practically and psychologically approach the students could arrange an alternative while facing the start of a professional practice. They were asked to create the opportunity for themselves to open up their own abilities of designing their daily life by creating methods to put themselves out of the originally economic structure.

Participants: Students Accademia Carrara di Belle Arti Bergamo, Remco Torenbosch

Initiated by: Alessandra Pioselli

Accademia Carrara di Belle Arti di Bergamo, Bergamo, Italy
May 7 — 8, 2012



The origins of the art gallery lie with the Count Giacomo Carrara, a wealthy collector and patron of the arts, who left a generous legacy to the city of Bergamo at the end of the 18th century. After the Count's death, in 1796, his properties were managed by a nominated commissary until 1958, when the Comune di Bergamo took over direct supervision. In 1810, a new building in the neoclassical style was constructed, the project being undertaken by the architect Simone Elia, a pupil of Leopoldo Pollack.

The museum has continued to augment its collections both with purchases and donations. As of 2006, it possesses 1,800 paintings dating from the 15th to the 19th century, and by artists including Pisanello, Botticelli, Bellini, Carpaccio, Mantegna, Raphael, Moroni, Baschenis, Fra Galgario, Tiepolo, Canaletto and Piccio. Besides paintings, there are drawings and prints, bronzes and sculptures, as well as collections of porcelain, furniture and medals. In 1793, at the same time as the public opening of his gallery, the Count Giacomo Carrara desired that drawing and painting courses be initiated in the same place. The school, which was located in the same building as the art gallery until 1912, now has its own premises nearby.

Since 1988, it has been an officially recognized Accademia di Belle Arti (Fine Arts Academy). In 1991, the modern art gallery Galleria d’Arte Moderna e Contemporanea (GAMEC) was opened on the opposite side of the road in a partially restored 14th-century monastery that had previously been used as a barracks. Presently, it has ten exhibition halls, on three floors. Since the purchase of the Gianfranco and Luigia Spajani collection in June 1999 the permanent collections have contained works by Italian and foreign artists of the 20th century including Boccioni, Balla, Morandi, Campigli, Casorati, Savinio, De Chirico, Kandinsky, Sutherland, and Manzù.


Università di Lingue e Comunicazione
IULM Università di Lingue e Comunicazione, Milan, Italy




Libera Università di Lingue e Comunicazione (IULM), Milan, Italy

Lecture about the subject of relevance: “Know, know how to be, know how to do”. It is on these three cornerstones that IULM University has based its teaching mission, taking inspiration from the principles of UNESCO. Taking strength from its vocation of integrating cultural knowledge and professional competences, the University has from its very inception over 40 years ago always presented itself as a meeting point between the academic world and labour markets.

The Istituto Universitario di Lingue Moderne (I.U.L.M.) was founded in 1968 by the Fondazione Scuola Superiore per Interpreti e Traduttori, under the inspiration of Senator Carlo Bo and Professor Silvio Baridon. From the very beginning the idea behind the project was to satisfy the demands of the labour markets based on analyses of current trends.

Participants: Students IULM Università di Lingue e Comunicazione, Remco Torenbosch

Initiated by: Paola Tognon

IULM, Università di Lingue e Comunicazione, Milan, Italy
May 10, 2012



Initially, this meant focusing on the study of languages – the sine qua non for becoming a part of an increasingly European framework. Things have changed over the years and it has become crucial to learn how to use specific communication tools. To meet this need, the university’s training opportunities and its facilities have been renewed and upgraded. It was a courageous development, in line with the principles that led IULM to change its identity and update all its syllabuses, closing the courses that had made the institute’s history, introducing new syllabuses and modifying the university’s charter and name. Introduced in 1998, the denomination IULM University of Languages and Communication bears out the institution’s two-fold vocation of teaching languages as well as communication. This is the core principle of the institute’s range of training opportunities.

Producing language and communication experts: this is the mission of IULM University. And to accomplish its mission the University assures its students not merely the technical skills required but also a cultural background. With its roots still firmly in culture and communication, IULM University has moved forward and committed its energies to the challenges of new educational horizons. IULM University offers five three-year degree courses: Public Relations and Business Communication; Communication, Media and Advertising; Interpreting and Communication; Tourism, Culture and Territory; Communication in Culture and Arts Markets. In addition to these three-year undergraduate degree courses, IULM University offers one- and two-year post-graduate degree courses, and also research doctorate schools. But where IULM University know-how really makes a difference is in its teaching methods. Teaching staff also includes managers and professionals from various fields, thus fostering close contact with the world of media and communication, professional services, business, public administration and cultural organisations. Teaching is done through lectures, classroom activities and case studies, continuous assessment, internships in Italy and abroad and through international student exchanges so as to reinforce both individual and team-work skills. Students have access to an innovative learning environment, equipped with the latest technologies and to a large library featuring the most updated systems


Autumn of Modernism
De Vleeshal, Middelburg, The Netherlands




Installation view of Autumn of Modernism at De Vleeshal Middelburg, 2012

The title of the exhibition was inspired by The Autumn of the Middle Ages, Johan Huizinga’s classic book published in 1919, a study of the forms of life, thought, and art at the end of the Middle Ages. The book shows that the artists of that period achieved their groundbreaking successes precisely because they drew on the past. This gave them a better grasp of the changes occurring all around them.

The explosion of news outlets and ways of consuming the news has made our society very focused on the now, and we sometimes forget to consider the future or the past. Artists try to step out of the present by consulting sources from the past and using them in their art, thus attempting to build bridges to the future.

Participants: Gwenneth Boelens, Piet Dieleman, gerlach en koop, Sara van der Heide, Martijn Hendriks, Bas van den Hurk, Rob Johannesma, Katja Mater, Marc Nagtzaam, Falke Pisano, Roma Publications, Petra Stavast, Batia Suter, Remco Torenbosch, Martijn in ’t Veld

Curator: Lorenzo Benedetti

De Vleeshal, Middelburg, The Netherlands
January 14 — March 24, 2012

Exhibition pictures




One element in this research is the creation of a collection fabric samples in the blue colour of the European flag, gathered in the countries of the European Union. With this collection of fabric samples Torenbosch is questioning if the collection can be ultimately considered as cultural objects and possibly can represent an ethnographic value as remnants from the various disappearing local textile industries, which results into wide social and economic changes. Within the colour differences between the fabric samples, this collection also underlines the European differences by country and it’s standard idea about the European blue. In the physical sense, the European blue colour functions as a monochrome within a modernist tradition with its purity laws, its longing for transcendence and an optimistic believe in the utopian potential. Simultaneously in a psychological sense the blue functions as a blue-screen (chroma key) where the broad and critical thoughts about Europe and the European Union can be projected, an idea that in both cases is a parallel to the so-called European collective thought.

The research European conceptualization in analytical philosophy on history and present started at the end of 2011. Components of this research are shown in the solo exhibition EUROPA at GAMeC - Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art in Bergamo, Italy. And in the group exhibition Autumn of Modernism curated by Lorenzo Benedetti and took place at De Vleeshal and at the Temporary Gallery in Cologne, Germany.
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Kitchen139: A Ten-day Communal Kitchen (...)
W139, Amsterdam, The Netherlands



Mandeville Reading at Kitchen139: A Ten-day Communal Kitchen Experiment A cooperation between W139 and Casco, in the context of The Grand Domestic Revolution – User’s Manual, Jan van Eyck Academie & KijkRuimte, 2012

More than half a century ago, Hannah Arendt stated that in the modern world two spheres of life – the private and the public –are no longer separate and the economy is actually very much about how to keep a household. However, how much do we know about our economy? Over a century ago, American feminists started building communal kitchens in order to socialise their isolated work as well as save time for other activities such as involvement in the suffrage movement.

What would we gain from such a communal kitchen today? And who is this “we”? W139 cooperates with Casco on ‘Kitchen139’, a ten-day open kitchen and activity series. We invite all for those occupied with multiple deadlines and appointments towards the end of year, to join a collective house management where cooking, eating, talking, thinking, cleaning are all coming together. Inspiring or even more fatiguing, or possibly both?

Participants: Emory Douglas, Occupy Amsterdam, Premsela, Remco Torenbosch, Jan van Eyck Academie a.o.

Curators: Binna Choi, Tim Voss

W139, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
December 9, 2011


Exhibition pictures



'Kitchen139' transforms W139 into a ten-day open kitchen and invites all of those occupied with multiple deadlines and appointments towards the end of year, to join a collective house management where cooking, eating, talking, thinking, cleaning are all coming together. Inspiring or even more fatiguing, or possibly both?

Each dinner will be prepared by a diversity of social and cultural initiatives, including Artists in Occupy Amsterdam, Amsterdam Dinner Movement and The Living Room(s), that will express their current works through the hospitality of cooking and serving. Each cooking process will be moderated by a host and broadcasted daily from 19.00-20.30 HRS on Red Light Radio for which listeners can not only learn of the original recipes but also the materials of thoughts behind them. Parallel to the cooking sessions will be a series of daily lectures by Amsterdam based economist Claus Peter Pfeffer on his alternative economic theory 'Plutopia - Policies for Globally Sustainable Common Wealth', aka Pfeifferism.

'Kitchen139' has been co-developed by W139 and Casco in the context of the current project exhibition at Casco 'The Grand Domestic Revolution 'User's Manual' (GDR). In GDR exhibition, on view through 26 February 2012, the private status of domestic space is questioned and new forms of life in common are searched for. 'Kitchen139' is conceived out of an observation of what one may call a resurgence of interest in domesticity and social change embodied by movements such as Occupy Amsterdam, who are making common domestic matters public on the Beursplein. Only 200 metres away, Kitchen139 could be considered as a differentiated, extended tent of Occupy Amsterdam and a voice in the continuous call for a grand domestic revolution today. Next to our evening program, the space will be open for daily public use.



Between Act and Protest (...)
IK Paviljoen, Oost-Souburg, The Netherlands




Installation view on Between Act and Protest: The Making of Political Textile or Making Textile Political, 2012


The machine monochromes (Protests Document; Conceptualization in analytical philosophy on history and present, textile version A, B, 2011) in the perspex frames are presented consist of two identical custom folded pieces of cotton from the tent industry. This particular material has increased since the last decade a prominent place during protests and demonstration camps such as the Puerta del Sol in Madrid, in Tahrir Square in Cairo during the global Occupy Movement. The canvas is stripped of its functional ornaments as stitching and zippers making the tent parts are returned to their original form and substance language. By this act are the materials are at an intermediate stage of function and action, what was previously a tent can now be a flag or banner, presented as a political object / document or just dust remain. Torenbosch these translations is especially interested in documenting the textile as an object which is normally a direct connection enters the cell, performative character which also features the protest.

Participants: Remco Torenbosch

IK Paviljoen, Oost-Souburg, The Netherlands
Pilot residency for the Mondriaan Foundation
November 27 — December 25, 2011




Founder and creator of the concept of the Foundation IK sculptor Jan van Munster (Gorinchem, 1939). Already in the 60s, his work in major museums in Netherlands. Then he quickly international fame. In contrast to the wide variety of the material in which he works, the theme is remarkably homogeneous. For decades he investigates consistently and increasingly from other angles the topic "energy". Heat and cold, light and darkness, tension and release, compression and expansion, visibility and invisibility witnesses of polarity that dominated his oeuvre. As a summary for all forms of tension chooses Van Munster around 1984 the sign + / - as commonly used, artistic formula. By making images which his own body dimensions underlie creates a new dimension: the imagination of his creative energy into his work. This led him to the suggestive formula I. Everyone refers to himself as IK. I respect everyone, challenges and demands. I, who is that?


An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth (...)
Stroom Den Haag, The Hague, The Netherlands




An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations and The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money at Stroom The Hague, 2011


In the form of a dialogue two speakers will recite two influential but conflicting theories on economy: by Adam Smith* and John Maynard Keynes**. The Stroom exhibition space will function as a platform for rehearsal. (at Stroom the texts were read by Joost Nieuwenburg and Mieke Coupé).

As part of: 'There, I Fixed It' stands for an attitude, a way of looking at materials and problems that is at the same time bold and unexpected. These problems can be small and trivial, but also large and global. The exhibition presents work that is characterized by the ability to turn the ordinary into something extraordinary. The artists succeed in doing this through their unique use of materials, a different view on what is useful and a great feeling for improvisation, self-sufficiency and temporality. The artists avoid, directly or indirectly, in a concrete or poetic way, dominant economic strategies and production models. Thereby they show us unruly solutions to urgent problems.

Orators: Joost Nieuwenburg, Mieke Coupé

Curator: Maaike Lauwaert

Stroom Den Haag, The Hague, The Netherlands
March 20, 2011


Exhibition pictures



* 'An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations' by Adam    Smith was first published in 1776.

** 'The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money' by John Maynard     Keynes was first published in 1936.